Many Hands is moving!

Thanks for checking the Dawn Road Reserve Bushcare Group website and welcome back for 2017. This year we will still be updating the website with select images and information but we are moving our monthly “Many hands” posts and photos onto Facebook and Instagram, including the freshest updates from the working bees. Don’t forget to Follow…

Now who’s a galah?

At our May 2016 Dawn Road Reserve Bushcare working bee, volunteers were treated to a special encounter with a pair of delicately coloured birds who seemed quite interested in what we were doing but not at all put off by our presence. With their rose-pink head, neck and underbelly, a paler pink crest with a…

Despite the heat, the February Dawn Road Bushcare Group got down to work with lots of enthusiasm

Many hands in 2016 …

Dawn Road Reserve Bushcare’s next 2-hour working bee is on Sunday, September 11, 2016, from 8am, at the end of McConachie Court. Please come along and join our happy crew as we do lots of important work in your neighbourhood. *** Remember to at least wear long trousers, a long-sleeved shirt, a broad-brimmed hat and sturdy, closed…

Another pink tie marking a healthy new plant in the Dawn Road Reserve Bushcare revegetation zone.

What do pink ties mean?

When the Dawn Road Reserve Bushcare volunteers position new plants along the special revegetation zone, they usually place a protective mesh cylinder around them until the plants are big enough to withstand the weather. Then, when the cylinders are removed, the growing plants are tagged with pink ties to distinguish them from weed species that…

Koala in Dawn Road Reserve (May 23, 2015)

Koala sighting

UPDATE (January, 2016): On New Year’s Day, 2016, we saw a smaller koala in the same tree and noted evidence around the base and up the trunk of significant scrapings and climbing marks! This is wonderful news. Will try to get a photo of this second koala over the coming weeks, but they are shy…

Bird survey

The Dawn Road Reserve is filled with birdlife and, led by Dawn Road Reserve Bushcare mentor Janet Mangan, a handful of volunteers combed the reserve for a couple of hours on Saturday morning, May 23, noting and sightings of birds in and around the bushland. From the outset at a point under the powerlines, we…

The striking blue triangle butterfly in the Dawn Road Reserve

Blue triangle butterfly

The stunning blue triangle butterfly (Graphium sarpedon) is very active and frequently seen around the Dawn Road Reserve. Also known as the common bluebottle swallowtail, its host plant is usually camphor laurel (Cinnamomum camphora) trees, a serious weed that can be found across the Reserve. It will also feed on other, nectar-rich native plants. Sources:…

Monarch butterfly rests on Brazilian nightshade weeds in the Dawn Road Reserve

Monarch butterfly

UPDATE (25/1/2016): Watch the fascinating lifecycle of the Monarch butterfly online. Known as the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus or wanderer butterfly), this insect is referred to by enthusiasts as the king of butterflies. While this insect is a regular visitor to the Dawn Road Reserve from late summer onwards for up to eight months (their usual…

An eastern grey kangaroo on the edge of the Dawn Road Reserve. (Picture: Peter Bull)

Eastern grey kangaroo

While you are far more likely to see – or hear – wallabies in and around the Dawn Road Reserve, particularly at night, you may be lucky during the day or evening to see the occasional eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). Our local wallabies – thought to be either red-necked wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) or black-striped wallabies (Macropus dorsalis) – are…

Close-up of the Mickey Mouse Plant (Ochna serrulata) showing darkening drupes ready to shed seed

Ochna serrulata

Those residents who live near – or enjoy exploring – the bushland in the Dawn Road Reserve may have noticed the distinctive Mickey Mouse Plant (Ochna serrulata). Its tell-tale green, glossy leaves with serrated margins plus its bright red stalks that carry berry-like ‘drupes’ – which turn from green to black – are not only…

An eastern long-necked turtle heads for higher ground after torrential rains in the Dawn Road Reserve

Eastern long-necked turtle

Usually, the shy eastern long-necked turtle (Chelodnina longicollis, or sometimes known as the snake-necked turtle for obvious reasons) keeps fairly close to the creek, but when we’ve had a decent downpour and the normally quiet Albany Creek starts roaring, these delightful creatures head for higher ground. In this case, this turtle ended up wandering around a local backyard…

A pair of Australian wood ducks (Chenonetta jubata) forage on the recently cleared embankment in the Dawn Road Reserve, near the end of McConachie Court. The male is at the front, the female behind.

Australian wood duck

Australian Wood Ducks (Chenonetta jubata)– medium-sized ‘goose-like’ ducks with a dark brown head and a paler grey or brownish body, with two black stripes along the back – are frequent visitors to the Dawn Road Reserve. This pair (female at the rear, male in foreground) are scavenging along the recently cleared embankment just before revegetation began.…

Billie the sulphur-crested cockatoo taking a walk through suburbia at Albany Creek

Sulphur-crested cockatoo

Regular visitors in and around the Dawn Road Reserve are the rather noisy sulphur-crested cockatoos (Cacatua galerita). You’ll hear one squawk to its mate or offspring, or evens dozens of them calling to one another as their flock scans the horizon for likely sources of food. According to Birds in Backyards, the large, white sulphur-crested…

The distinctive cumbungi (Typha domingensis) lines the waterway at the end of McConachie Court

Cumbungi (bullrush)

Whenever there are small streams or overland flows criss-crossing the Dawn Road Reserve, you are likely to see a north Queensland native water weed called cumbungi (Typha domingensis) – also known as bullrushes or ca’ts tails. Sadly, cumbungi has spread to south-east Queensland and you can find quite a bit of it along the stream that runs…

Easter cassia (Senna pendula var. glabrata) in flower with its prolific, bright yellow blooms

Easter cassia

The showy, bright-yellow flowering Easter cassia (Senna pendula var. glabrata) can grow to around 5m in height and is dotted throughout the Dawn Road Reserve, particularly where there are sunny clearings or openings in the overhead canopy. You have probably seen this eye-catching plant, alongside roads and waterways, or even in domestic gardens. After it…

Alexandra palms invaded the riparian zone at the end of McConachie Court

Alexandra palm

You see them in many places around Brisbane, including private gardens, but the tall Alexandra palm (Archontophoenix alexandrae) can grow up to 30m in height, with a crown containing around 10-12 long leaves that themselves can measure up to 4.5m. Unfortunately, while they are native to northern parts of Queensland, the Alexander palm has become…

This weed species, wild tobacco, has sprung up all over the Dawn Road Reserve.

Wild tobacco

Wild tobacco (Solanum mauritianum) shrubs, which can grow up to 4m in height, can be seen in many places throughout the Dawn Road Reserve. Originally from Argentina, this weed forms dense stands and suppresses the growth of other species. According to the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, wild tobacco likes disturbed sites and its…